As I mentioned recently in another review, with most filmmakers being in their 30s now, the 90s nostalgia is expected to hit the silver screen as it did with the 80s for the last decade. One of the trends that hit its hardest in the 90s and still has roots in the now is the show Power Rangers. A show originally created in Japan with American actor segments for the US release that had a team of super teens facing off against monstrous evil-doers was incredibly popular. Psycho Goreman then raises the question of what would happen if one of these infinitely powerful monsters that was defeated by the powers of good, found itself in the servitude of two children? Hilarity to say the least.

While digging in the yard one night Mimi (Nita-Josee Hanna) and Luke (Owen Myre) discover a mysterious stone and pull it from the ground. Little do they know that they have released an ancient evil that ravaged the galaxy until it was defeated by a hero and sealed away. The creature now awakened plans on leading a path of destruction through the universe and reclaiming his title of the “Arch-Duke of Nightmares”. Unfortunately for it as long as the kids retain the stone, it is under their control and they have named it Psycho Goreman.

When people think of movies, they tend to think about actors, plots, and special effects, but little of the writing. Writing in a film often only becomes clear when it is exceptionally bad, or incredibly good and Psycho Goreman is a brilliantly written film. From character interactions to the dialogue, everything is fun, exciting, and laugh out loud. This is a film that is so quotable that days after seeing I kept thinking of my favorite lines and my friends continued to repeat theirs.

Hand in hand with good writing is having competent actors and it is plain to see between Psycho Goreman, Stranger Things, and IT, we are living in a golden age of child actors. Mimi and Luke are exactly how one would expect kids to act if they had control over a practically unstoppable evil. Luke being rightfully terrified while interested in the possibilities, and Mimi going on a powertrip with her new best friend and enforcer. Their charm, along with the rest of the cast, is undeniable and creates so many wonderfully absurd moments.

If the writing in films is unimportant to you, you couldn’t care less if the actors have any talent, and you are only interested in having fun, Psycho Goreman has you covered. I often find it hard to write a standard review for films that hit the middle ground between great and terrible but I have to limit this review so I don’t keep going on and on about this movie. If nothing has you hooking is this review, consider that every creature, costume, and gore effect are all practical and CGI is only ever used to exemplify the powers and is used as tongue in cheek as possible. This film is just plain fun and silly and the world knows we need that now more than ever.

 

8 out of 10

 

Psycho Goreman
RATING: UR
Runtime: 1 Hr 35 Mins.
Directed By:
Written By:

About the Author: Max Matta

A huge horror fan with a fondness for 80s slashers. Can frequently be found at southern California horror screenings and events.